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AREA and Digital Twin Consortium Establish Strategic Relationship

On December 3rd, the AREA took a big step toward facilitating that convergence and maximizing those benefits by signing a Memo of Understanding (MoU) with the Digital Twin Consortium® (DTC). Known as the Authority in Digital Twin, DTC coalesces industry, government, and academia to drive consistency in vocabulary, architecture, security, and interoperability of Digital Twin technology.

Under the MoU, AREA Steering Committee member Christine Perey will serve as the liaison between the two organizations to build a deep and multi-faceted strategic relationship. DTC and the AREA will collaborate to:

  • define industry requirements;
  • increase the degree to which enabling technology components interoperate;
  • align work underway to accelerate adoption of Digital Twins and Augmented Reality in many vertical domains and use cases; and
  • develop proof of concepts projects and programs, and joint marketing efforts.

“We’re excited about the many opportunities our liaison with DTC will enable,” said Mark Sage, Executive Director of the AREA. “For AREA members, it’s a chance to help ensure that enterprise AR and Digital Twin technologies move forward in sync to accelerate adoption, reduce costs, and reap new benefits.”

“Augmented Reality and Digital Twins are an ideal combination, as together they allow users to visualize the invisible,” said Dan Isaacs, CTO, Digital Twin Consortium. “This includes enhancing situational awareness and event intelligence for training in assembly, installation, maintenance, operation, compliance assurance, and safety. For infrastructure projects, this combination enables visibility inside the walls of a building or structure, or the power, connectivity, or water piping and conduits under streets and roadways, and much more.”

As the two organizations begin working together, the enterprise AR ecosystem can look forward to a growing number of jointly developed projects, events, and resources, including webinars, white papers, and presentations.




Press Release – AREA and Digital Twin Consortium Establish Strategic Relationship

Under the MoU, DTC and the AREA will collaborate to:

  • Define industry requirements
  • Increase the degree to which enabling technology components interoperate
  • Align work underway to accelerate adoption of digital twins and Augmented Reality in many vertical domains and use cases
  • Develop proof of value projects and programs, and joint marketing efforts

“We’re excited about the many opportunities our liaison with DTC will enable,” said Mark Sage, Executive Director of the AREA. “For AREA members, it’s a chance to help ensure that enterprise AR and digital twin technologies move forward in sync to accelerate adoption, reduce costs, and reap new benefits.”

“Augmented reality and digital twins are an ideal combination as together, they allow users to visualize the invisible,” said Dan Isaacs, CTO, Digital Twin Consortium. “This includes enhancing situational awareness and event intelligence for training in assembly, installation, maintenance, operation, compliance assurance, and safety. For infrastructure projects, this combination enables visibility inside the walls of a building or structure, or the power, connectivity, or water piping and conduits under streets and roadways, and much more.”

As the two organizations begin working together, Digital Twin Consortium and the AREA ecosystems can look forward to a growing number of jointly developed projects, events, and resources, including webinars, white papers, and presentations.

About the AREA

The Augmented Reality for Enterprise Alliance (AREA) is the only global non-profit, member-based organization that is dedicated to the widespread adoption of interoperable AR-enabled enterprise systems. Whether you view it as the next computing paradigm, the key to breakthroughs in manufacturing and service efficiencies, or the door to as-yet unimagined applications, AR will have an unprecedented impact on enterprises of all kinds. The AREA is a program of OMG. Visit https://thearea.org for more information.

About Digital Twin Consortium

Digital Twin Consortium is The Authority in Digital Twin. It coalesces industry, government, and academia to drive consistency in vocabulary, architecture, security, and interoperability of digital twin technology. It advances the use of digital twin technology in many industries, from aerospace to natural resources. Digital Twin Consortium is a program of Object Management Group (OMG). For more information about Digital Twin Consortium, please visit our website at https://www.digitaltwinconsortium.org/.

Note to editors: Digital Twin Consortium is a registered trademark of OMG. For a listing of all OMG trademarks, visit https://www.omg.org/legal/tm_list.htm. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

 




Join Boeing’s Real-World Factory Floor XR Team

Join Boeing’s Real-World Factory Floor XR Team

While some organizations’ AR/XR efforts are still limited to experiments and proofs of concept, Boeing is moving forward with fully-deployed and industrialized factory floor solutions.

As part of that effort, Boeing’s Product Systems Information Technology & Data Analytics organization is staffing up and seeking Mid-level Factor XR Software developers to join its Factory XR team.

If you’re qualified and eager to help scale up real-world XR solutions at an industry leader, go here to learn more and apply.




Meet New AREA Member ASME

AREA: For our readers who aren’t familiar with ASME, could you tell us about its mission?

Reilley: ASME is both a professional development society and a standards development organization. As a professional development society, we encourage and nurture engineering from K through 12, up through university and throughout engineers’ careers. We operate education programs, learning and development, events, and conferences, and we provide all sorts of useful content. We look to nurture and develop the engineer throughout their entire lifetime. And we’ve been a standards development organization for 140 years.

Sanna: Our work as a standards developer started during the Industrial Revolution with boilers. Nowadays, we’ve branched out into a multitude of technologies and processes, such as verification and validation, big data, additive manufacturing/3D printing, medical devices, robotics, and much more. We’re accredited as a standards developer by the American National Standards Institute. Our real core competency is finding the need that exists in global industry or in research, finding the subject matter experts and the organizations with a grounded interest in that technology or the subject matter, convening them and applying a process to make sure that all points of view are considered so we can achieve consensus. I should also point out we’ve often pushed back against overemphasis of the letter “A” in our name because we don’t have borders, per se. Our committees that write and update standards for us and find new areas for standardization are populated by people from the four corners of the Earth.

 

AREA: How did ASME’s interest in Augmented Reality come about?

Reilley: A few years ago, we identified the need to focus on what we call digital engineering. As a society of mechanical engineers, we know full well that fluids engineering and heat transfer are the cornerstones of a mechanical engineer’s degree, but with the rapid evolution of technology, engineers also need to be very well acquainted with digital engineering technologies, which include AR and VR. We recognize that, increasingly, mechanical engineers will need to work with software engineers and Augmented Reality use cases across all industries. We just wanted to make sure that we have a seat at the table as we work towards a more multidisciplinary future.

Sanna: I would add that, from the standards perspective, we have an immediate need for our standards to adapt to new disciplines and new applications. For example, we have standards and a constituency that deal with oil and gas, for example, which includes remote inspection. Even though the technology around industrial piping systems and pressurized tanks is very well established and mature, the inspection and maintenance applications are continuing to progress. Hence our standards initiatives on remote inspection, a subject which, by the way, we’ll be hosting a virtual event about on December 8 and 9. But then we also have newer activities and standards, like mobile unmanned systems and remote-control hydraulic platforms with transport capabilities.

 

AREA: In terms of AR standards development, are you still in the early stages?

Sanna: We’re just getting started in exploring how to apply AR and remote concepts to our existing activities. The bigger question is for us to determine the state of the AR ecosystem. Is there a lack of consensus that could be ameliorated with some standardization or at least getting everyone on the same page? We’re very much in a learning process and trying to get steeped in what the AREA’s constituents are doing, what they want, what they’ve achieved so far.

 

AREA: Since AR does touch a lot of different areas, as you’ve already mentioned, how does ASME work with other organizations that might also be involved in working on interoperability and standards?

Sanna: There are occasions where we set out on a path of developing a joint standard, thus we have relationships with other standards developers on a technical level, such as the American Concrete Institute and the American Nuclear Society, to name a few. We also have relationships in which representatives from groups like the Canadian Standards Association and the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers sit on our committees. This ensures that when these organizations write something, they don’t go off in a completely different direction than us and the global industry can move forward.

Reilley: To give you another example, we’re also conducting an activity in regenerative medicine surrounding tissue-engineered medical products, or TEMPs. We are working with the Standards Coordinating Body, the SCB, which is under the auspices of the FDA and NIST, the National Institute of Standards and Technology. ASME is working on standardizing the hardware for bioprinting technologies, IEEE is working on a standard for the electrical systems for bioprinting technologies, and ASTM is working on what are called bioinks for the actual cells that are being 3D-printed. So, again, we’re making sure that our efforts are complementary in this consortium.

 

AREA: ASME has already jumped into AREA activities by hosting the recent Digital Twin Summit. But tell us more about what you hope to get out of your AREA membership and what we can expect from ASME’s participation in the AREA.

Reilley: A large part of this is an education for ASME. We really want to connect with those in the enterprise AR industry to understand the needs and the gaps and learn how ASME can make a positive impact by lending our core competencies to the effort. We also are looking to expand our network and extend the opportunity for AREA members to collaborate on ASME event programming, webinars, and other content.

Sanna: We can also help the AREA to convene subject matter experts and thought leaders to get guidance out on the street fast, knowing that it reflects the consensus of the industry. That’s something we’re very good at. Our own constituents can also benefit through our interaction. We’re looking at how we can introduce our ASME members to the AREA so they can network, discover the state of the art and the benchmarks for various applications. We’re casting a wide net and it’s going to take us a bit of time, but we want to get the right ASME people plugged into the AREA activities that really move the needle for us.

Reilley: I wanted to add that our strength at ASME is our dedicated infrastructure for developing standards. We have degreed engineers on staff and it’s their role to manage committees and volunteers to get standards through the approval process. It’s something that we pride ourselves on, and a way that we can offer the AREA real value.

 




Object Management Group to Join Forces with Augmented Reality Enterprise Alliance

“Augmented Reality offers tremendous potential for enterprises. It promises to increase productivity, lower costs, improve safety, enable expertise sharing, and more,” said Mark Sage, Executive Director, the AREA. “OMG has years of experience in fast-tracking innovative technologies through member-led consortia. We’re excited to join forces with OMG to help accelerate the adoption of AR technologies in the enterprise.”

As an OMG program, the AREA will continue to offer resources and neutral, reliable guidance for enterprises to facilitate AR adoption. AREA will publish in-depth materials, such as developer guides on using open, AR-enabling technologies and best practices for enterprise AR safety, security, and quality. AREA members will continue to collaborate on solutions to the barriers to AR adoption. And the alliance will continue to host member and public meetings about AR-enabled enterprise systems and other programs.

“We’re excited by the growth and advancement of AR technologies on all fronts – including technology, standards, and general awareness,” said Bill Hoffman, President, OMG. “We share so much synergy with the efforts of the AREA that it just made sense to join forces. The resulting combination of memberships, resources, and shared knowledge will further the growth of AR technologies.”

About the AREA

The Augmented Reality for Enterprise Alliance (AREA) is the only global non-profit, member-based organization that is dedicated to the widespread adoption of interoperable AR-enabled enterprise systems. Whether you view it as the next computing paradigm, the key to breakthroughs in manufacturing and service efficiencies, or the door to as-yet unimagined applications, AR will have an unprecedented impact on enterprises of all kinds. Visit https://thearea.org for more information.

About OMG

The Object Management Group® (OMG®) is an international, open membership, not-for-profit technology standards consortium with representation from government, industry, and academia. OMG develops enterprise integration standards for a wide range of technologies and an even wider range of industries. Visit www.omg.org for more information.

 




Call for 10th Research Project Proposals – 3D mapping of enterprise and industrial environments for AR.

Industry Context for the Research

In showcases, Augmented Reality can be implemented to provide a highly sensitive, contextually-aware user interface to an enterprise’s facilities and assets. In such demonstrations, AR leverages prior investments to create and maintain “digital twins.” Having 3D models and maps of infrastructure and environments reduces the cost of AR experience development and discovery, and having AR-assisted devices continuously monitoring the real world permits updating the digital twins. Combining AR and 3D models and “spatially-anchored” or -aligned maps increases the ROI for several information technology stacks and reduces cost of operation and ownership.

Yet, in practice, enterprises seeking to expand their AR deployment in environments that can be captured in 3D are encountering significant obstacles. Even when available, AR experience authoring, publishing and delivery systems rarely connect to enterprise 3D environment maps, therefore, do not leverage existing investments. Developers must author or revise experiences every time there are changes in the environment. Users have to manually select AR experiences or AR-assisted procedures, instead of having a solution that automatically detects and associates procedures or other information with the user’s environment.

Practical knowledge about how to leverage existing spatial mapping for AR platforms and other tools/use cases is low. Knowledge of tools and techniques for creating and managing 3D environment maps (offline or in-situ) is also low. As a result, developers and engineers deploying enterprise AR miss valuable opportunities to:

      • Choose when/how/with which partners to add 3D mapping to their tool chains
      • Integrate and leverage 3D mapping in their authoring platforms
      • Integrate feature detection from 3D maps into AR experiences
      • Quickly and accurately capture 3D environments
      • Leverage existing standards for rapid/future-proof AR solutions based on 3D mapping

Project Goal

The AREA seeks to provide its members knowledge and deep understanding of the current state of the art of continuous or periodic 3D mapping of enterprise and industrial environments for AR and the available tools to leverage this information for the development of spatially aware applications such as AR. The project will also provide actionable information which members can use to more effectively identify solution providers and partners, and to leverage prior investments made by their own organizations or by their customers and partners, in digital twins and 3D spatial maps.

Fixed Fee Project

The AREA Research Committee budget for this project is $15,000. Organizations interested in conducting this research for the fixed fee are invited to submit proposals.

More information

Full information on the project needs, desired outcomes and required components of a winning proposal, including a submission form, can be found here.

If you have any questions concerning this project and the AREA Research Committee, please send an email to the Research Committee.

 




A Talk with Christine Perey About the AREA Interoperability & Standards Program

 

AREA: How long have you been involved in standardization activities?

Perey: My role in standardization activities began in 1994 when I joined the ITU-T committee standardizing video conferencing. Seeing needs for interoperability in AR as early as 2010, I formed and led a grassroots community advocating for development of standards for AR. I have chaired dozens of meetings and workshops, and given dozens of webinars on the topics of projects and/or standards that could contribute to the advancement and adoption of open interfaces and AR interoperability. I work directly with a wide range of standards development organizations (SDO). As a member, a working group chair or co-chair, or as an invited expert, I currently contribute to nearly 20 standards. Outreach and coordination between SDOs is another passion of mine. On October 4, 2021, I chaired a tutorial coordinated with Khronos Group and ETSI ISG ARF about AR interoperability and standards in the context of the ISMAR 2021 conference. I encourage people interested in this topic and seeking to better understand what’s available to explore the tutorial website.

AREA: Tell us more about the AREA Interoperability & Standards program.

Perey: Through the Interoperability & Standards program, the AREA seeks to increase knowledge about the benefits and approaches to achieving interoperability and to advance the development of standards or other approaches to interoperability. That entails: informing AREA members and the enterprise AR ecosystem about existing standards for interoperable AR solutions through development of thought leadership content; supporting the identification of interoperability requirements in customer organizations; supporting the identification of interfaces in AR components that, through implementations, provide interoperability in enterprise AR solutions and services; engaging with organizations and members, including those dedicated to standards development and promotion of standards to provide requirements; and building a base of AR professionals who are well versed in the implementation of existing standards for AR, and promote the development and adoption of extensions to existing standards as well as new standards.

AREA: Why are standards so important to enterprise AR adoption?

Perey: The motivations for adopting standards depend on the segment of the ecosystem to which a company belongs. Let’s take the customer segment, because when technology buyers are successful, so are their partners and providers. Today, when companies begin evaluating enterprise AR use cases they do so with isolated projects (products are not integrated with enterprise systems) and using products of one or a few technology providers. In companies that are advanced in their study of AR, there can be partial or full testbeds of multiple AR technology providers, but they are often isolated from other AR projects and are not integrated with enterprise systems.

A company seeking to maintain and expand its testing within a specific technology segment (e.g., comparing multiple providers or models of hardware) or to implement at scale in their enterprise confronts significant obstacles. It has been demonstrated in other industries that when standards or open source interfaces and guidelines have been widely accepted and implemented across an ecosystem, higher technology interoperability can: reduce barriers to deployment of multivendor or multi-product solutions (also known as “integration”); lower costs of ownership; reduce risks of vendor lock-in; and increase innovation and opportunities for new sales through provider specialization. Barriers are removed and everyone benefits.

AREA: What’s on the horizon for the AREA Interoperability & Standards program?

Perey: We will continue to develop thought leadership content, through hosted webinars, white papers, and blog articles, as well as participation in relevant conferences and events. As the awareness of interoperability as a key to success rises, we will work with large enterprises deploying AR to develop their interoperability requirements and integration needs and bring them to the attention of SDOs and the AR technology providers. We will act as a conduit from SDOs to AREA member companies – providers as well as customer segment members – to share SDO draft specifications and gather and deliver feedback to them. And, where there are implementations and testing suites, we will work to support the testing of products and services that comply with international standards in real-world settings.

AREA: Why should AREA members consider participating in the Interoperability & Standards program?

Perey: This is a program that can only thrive when AR customers are actively sharing their requirements and real-world experiences. So we’re looking for AREA members to contribute to the program by preparing blog posts on topics that will share their thought leadership and raise awareness about specific or general challenges. Topics could include: key interoperability and standards requirements for enterprise AR; developing best practices for safety, human factors, and more; sharing their experiences in standards development; and recounting their experiences implementing one or more standards in specific use cases or products. AR component and solution providers will increasingly be able to showcase interoperability through AREA programs to advance interoperability such as plug-fests and testbeds. Now is the time, while AR standards are under development, to make sure your voice is heard, your needs are being considered, and your experiences are being shared.

If you’re an AREA member and would like more information about participating in the AREA Interoperability & Standards program, please contact Christine Perey. If you’re not yet an AREA member but want to see an AR ecosystem that derives the full benefit of standardization and interoperability efforts, please consider joining us. You can find membership information here.

 

 




AREA Webinar Replay: IDC Analyst Sizes the Enterprise AR Hardware Market

That’s why, in early September, the AREA hosted a webinar entitled Sizing the Enterprise AR Hardware Market. The centerpiece of the event was a presentation by Tom Mainelli, VP of Devices at IDC, one of the IT industry’s most respected global analyst firms. We recorded the webinar and it’s now available here.

During the webinar, Mr. Mainelli explains how IDC sizes the current market and forecasts enterprise AR hardware growth. Along the way, he provides answers to such questions as:

  • What are the different approaches IDC uses when estimating enterprise AR hardware market size and growth?
  • What factors does IDC forecasting take into account when sizing the adoption of enterprise AR?
  • What important developments in 2021 will make this year memorable in the annals of enterprise AR history?

Don’t miss this opportunity to get an exclusive presentation of valuable insights about market sizing principles shared by one of the world’s leading analysts studying the AR display hardware market. Go here to view this one-hour presentation.




Using Theorem-XR and HoloLens 2 for Engineering Reviews

You can watch the full webinar on Using Theorem-XR and HoloLens 2 for Engineering Reviews.

Key highlights

Theorem has also picked out 5 key benefits of using the Microsoft HoloLens 2 in Engineering which appear in full detail on their blog.

Visualize your models at full scale.
Work collaboratively with other engineers.
Make better factory planning decisions.
Work with large datasets using Azure Remote Rendering.
You can still work with colleagues that are using other XR technologies, or none at all.




Keen Research Brings the Power of Speech Recognition to AR